The key to a better job and a higher salary is….

…Creativity.

Yes, our Creator’s call to create like Him will not just help you see your daily work and calling in a brighter and better light, it will also improve your professional prospects and increase your salary.

As Tony Wagner reported in Creating Innovators, corporations and institutions are increasingly looking for evidence of creativity and innovation in their hiring and promotional decisions:

  • According to a 2008 Conference Board report, “U.S. employers rate creativity/innovation among the top five skills that will increase in importance over the next five years.”
  • Stimulating innovation/creativity and enabling entrepreneurship is among the top 10 challenges of U.S. CEO’s.
  • In a 2010 McKinsey & Company global survey, 84 percent of executives say innovation is extremely or very important.

In a world of intense global competition, companies are desperately trying to stand out through innovative products, services, and marketing. In most fields, it’s no longer enough to be average or even good at what you do. Human Resource managers want to see evidence of initiative and innovation, even if it’s in an entirely unrelated field. It’s problem-solving ability and opportunity-making (and taking) character they are looking for. “Has he taken any risks in his life? Has she branched out on her own before? Has he done anything different?”

Christians who know THE Creator and learn from Him how to create like Him in their own little corner of the creation, should have a massive competitive advantage in the workplace and marketplace.

They also get to glorify and enjoy God better.


Check out

Samuel Miller’s Triumph over Pastoral Distraction
Are you tempted by digital distraction and political partisanship? Gary Steward invites you to learn from Samuel Miller’s life: “When Miller became a professor at Princeton, he renounced the social, intellectual, and political entanglements that had ensnared him as a pastor in New York.  By the time he arrived at Princeton he had already renounced all connections with the Masonic Lodge.  He also came to renounce his Jeffersonian political views and see his former political partisanship in a negative light altogether.”

Joy in the Midst of Hope Deferred
Then Mike Leake points us to another Samuel (the Rutherford variety) for help in dealing with disappointment.

Without blogging, would we ever see such great short pieces as these come to public attention? Isn’t it a great way for people to share brief insights and spiritual lessons without having to write a whole book about it!

10 Ways Blogging has Made me More Productive
While we’re on the subject, I’m always amazed by how often people associate blogging with time-wasting. It can be a time-sink, of course. However, my own experience has been much more along the lines of this article.

7 Ways Twitter Sharpens Your Writing
Yes, even Twitter can be a help to overall communication. I certainly know a few writers (and preachers!) who could benefit from some Twitter training.

How to write a Theology Essay
Just in case my students begin to think I’m for dumbing down.

Guns, Gangs, and God: Why you should care about Chicago
Ending the week on a sobering note: “Chicago Homicides Outnumber U.S. Troop Killings In Afghanistan.” Although we may differ on how to address this carnage, I agree with the writer’s conclusion: “Everyone cannot get to Chicago overnight to impact that city, but you can be effective in your own city. When you show a concern, things can change.”


Tweets of the Day


Calling all students, Moms, plumbers and teachers!

Be honest, student, when was the last time you started an essay thinking, “How can I create like my Creator?”

And stressed-out Mom, when you did the kitchen makeover, did you once think, “I’m creating like my Creator”?

My muddy plumber friend, have you ever seen your daily work as a replay of Genesis 1, bringing light out of darkness, order out of disorder?

Inspiring teacher, do you know that you are creating like your Creator by spicing up your world history lessons with videos and group activities?

No, I didn’t think so. Creativity and innovation is for science labs, artists’ easels, and designers’ studios isn’t it? It’s got nothing to do with learning, organizing, draining, or teaching does it? It’s for Steve Jobs, Salvador Dali, and Coco Chanel, not students, Moms, plumbers and teachers isn’t it? It’s for the extraordinary; not us ordinary people, right?

Extraordinary calling for ordinary people
Wrong. No matter how ordinary we are, we all have an extraordinary calling to be creators. Our Creator created us like Him, and called us to create like Him in everyday life.

Every word we speak, every decision we make, every service we offer, and even every customer complaint presents us with a choice: create, status quo, or destroy? Make, maintain, or mutilate?

Just think about the next conversation you have. Each sentence is your creation. You decide whether to create it and how. Will it build up, destroy, or do nothing. Will it be positive or negative? Long or short? Loud or quiet? Angry or kind? Factual or figurative? The creative possibilities are endless.

Saucers, staplers, and screwdrivers
Even problems are creative opportunities, because every problem is overcome by creating a solution. Every item in your kitchen drawer, office cupboard, or tool box is the result of creative problem solving, usually by unknown ordinary people going about their ordinary everyday lives.

And yet we don’t often think like this do we?

And the main reason is we don’t know Genesis 1-2 well enough and the patterns it lays down for our everyday lives. I was struck by my own ignorance of this when I started reading secular books on creativity and began seeing how many of them unknowingly paralleled the creation account in Genesis 1-2. As the authors laid out their techniques and methods of creativity, I kept thinking, “That’s what God did. That’s what God’s like.”

When I went back and re-read Genesis 1-2, I began to see principles and practices of creativity that I had completely overlooked. When God created everything, He laid down patterns for His image-bearing creators living and working in His creation: planning, imagination, teamwork, initiative, action, organization, routine, focus, beauty, happiness, optimism, satisfaction, rest, and so on.

First question
That means the first question we need to ask in the morning is not “What will I do?” but “Who am I?” Or, even more accurately, “Whose am I?”

When we see ourselves, and help our children to see, that we are God’s creatures, made in His image to create like Him, we not only know who we are, we will also know what we should do, how we should do it, and why we are doing it.

All Christians believe in the truth of a Creator and do creative things. But we need to bring that truth and these practices together and to the front of our Christian minds. When we see our calling is to create like our Creator, we exalt Him in everything and also invest every activity with new significance, meaning, and even worship.


Check out

A Legacy Worth Leaving
Identified very much with this testimony from Joyce Dalrymple and the role of James Dobson’s “Strong Willed Child” resources.

“Follow your passion”
“Follow your passion” is an inspiring slogan, but its reign as the cornerstone of modern American career advice needs to end.

Mother who aborted her baby at 39 weeks sent to prison
Mr Justice Cooke said: “What you have done is rob an apparently healthy child, vulnerable and defenceless, of the life which he was about to commence.”

The Simple Power of One a Day
“There are at least 200 working days a year. If you commit to doing a simple marketing item just once each day, at the end of the year you’ve built a mountain.” Substitute “spiritual” for “marketing” and start making some spiritual mountains out of molehills.

Shepherding a bored mother’s heart
Four reasons why some mothers struggle with boredom

The Gospel for Sudden and Tragic Loss


Six Audiences


Every organization chooses its own audience…But don’t doubt that it changes everything you do (Seth Godin).


I’ve suggested six church parallels for the six audience choices described by Godin:

  • The sales force = The pastors
  • The stock market = The major donors
  • Potential new customers = The unevangelized
  • Existing customers = Church members
  • Employees = Church staff
  • The regulators = Elders, Presbytery, Denomination, etc.

Who is your audience? Who is your church focused on? Is there Someone missing here?

Godin: “You get what you focus on.”